Angels On Earth Magazine Reviews And Comments - Page 1

Reviews For Angels On Earth Magazine


True stories about encounters with angels

Some anonymous person left three issues of this magazine in the chiropractor's office, where my wife started reading and then asked if she could have them. Sure, said the receptionist. Thus were we introduced to a very inspirational magazine. Who knows? Maybe it was angel-guided. We like this magazine enough to subscribe -- which is what brought me here to do this review.

"Angels on Earth" is published six times a year by Guideposts, which many people know through the "Guideposts" magazine (inspirational) and holiday theme books. Although Guideposts is definitely a Christian publisher, the "Angels" magazine itself is non-denominational and even inter-religious at times. One of the three issues we found in the doctor's office had a story about a Jewish Holocaust survivor. Another story was about a child looking for a lost cat, with no real focus on God as such, other than being "guided" to look in an unlikely place. Some of the people in the stories aren't all that religious or, if they are, their particular religion is presented as a part of their personal bio as it fits into the story, not as preaching or "witnessing."

The illustrations, too vary widely -- from "church Sunday school" pictures of angels from the Renaissance Masters, to more ordiinary drawings of sea captains, cops, lumberjacks, ordinary moms and dads -- depending on the story they illustrate. (If you know "Guideposts", you know the artwork -- otherwise, think "Reader's Digest.")

The purpose of the magazine is not to convert you to anything but, rather, to tell true stories about people who have had encounters with guardian angels. "Belief" is left up to the reader. Some of the angel stories are of the "miracle" type: surviving car crashes, shipwrecks, serious illnesses, etc. Others are of the more "ordinary" type, such as the stranger who is there at the right moment. This fits with the Jewish POV of an angel, since the Hebrew word, malach, can refer either to a supernatural being or an earthly messenger.

Personally, I believe in angels, and I find the stories fascinating. Granted, some of them might strike you as versions of "The Vanishing Hitchhiker." On the other hand, all the stories are first-person, by-lined accounts, often with photos of the people or animals involved. And how do we know the Vanishing Hitchhiker isn't a real angel sometimes?

Digest-sized mega-inspiration!

Angels on Earth magazine was mentioned in a blog I stumbled upon about a year ago. On a whim, I decided to subscribe. It was money well-spent.

This little magazine is filled with short articles and some surprisingly beautiful illustrations to give you that little shot of inspiration to carry you through another day of life. I sometimes stash it in my bag, and when I have a moment I read a page or two, and it gives me a sense of peace and calm.

Sometimes, you just need to stop and smell the roses... or see the Angels! I've passed old issues of it on to others, and they have all fallen in love with Angels on Earth magazine.

Perhaps you will, too.

The angels in our lives--

Angels have a habit of appearing at just the right moment and in the most unlikely of places. In the January/February 2008 issue Angels on Earth magazine these "messengers" (the word angel comes from the Greek word "angelos" which means messenger.) were spotted in a fancy French restaurant, on duty after Hurricane Katrina, and during a moment of weakness. In my own case, my Valentine Angel (pg 44) worked for the local utility company.

Reading about the angelic encounters of others can give us hope in our own life. "Every visible thing in this world," said St Augustine, "is put under the charge of an angel." Angels do exist and if you are open you will soon have your own story to share.

Different than I remember it tp be.

The stories are nice but when I receieved the first copy I thought it was a small catalog. I know it was never as large as other magazines but its really small. Its not a bad magazine but I won't be reordering.

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